Category Archives: Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2

Floating away.

I photographed this para-sailing scene just over a year ago.   Soon after, I decided to bid goodbye to my Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 lens.

For some reason I never got around to posting this image, until now.

Floating away

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Wet-noodle.

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

The Konica Hexanon 60/1.2 (and the Steve Huff Effect).

Today I noticed an unusual spike in traffic to this site, mainly because of increased interest in my write-up of the Konica Hexanon 60/1.2.

I was a little confused as to why an article that I posted almost a year ago was suddenly popular again (normally it’s my write-up of the Voigtländer Nokton 40/1.4 that gets the most attention).  Then I visited the website of my good friend Steve Huff.  Steve is about to host a photo cruise and he’s managed to secure a copy of the Konica 60/1.2 to use during his time away.   One mention of this lens on his site and suddenly everybody is interested in it (that’s the Steve Huff Effect :)).

It’ll be interesting to see how well the Konica Hexanon 60/1.2 fares mounted on the Fuji X-Pro 1 that Steve is taking with him.

—Peter.

Electric.

Blue.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Parasailing.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

3 years of haircuts.

(please click on the image to view)

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1st image (2010): Nikon D3S and Nikkor-NOCT 58mm @ f/1.2.

2nd image (2011): Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

3rd image (2012): Leica M9 and Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH @ f/1.4.

My “Photographing your family…” article featured on Steve Huff Photo.com!

My “Photographing your family with the BEST photo equipment” article was featured today on SteveHuffPhoto.com!

I’m once again honoured and would like to thank Steve for his ongoing support of my work!

If you want to see the article, as posted on Steve’s site, please click here.

For convenience, I’m re-posting the images below.

Thanks for reading,

—Peter.

(please click on the images below to view them LARGE)

In praise of blurry images.

Sometimes I choose to post a blurry image.

Admittedly, most of the time it has been generated as a result of user (me!) error.  Occasionally, I’ve planned it.  Regardless of how it’s arrived at, there is something about it that has caught my eye.  Invariably, somebody will condemn it by pointing out the obvious: “it’s blurry”.  End of story.

Or is it?

Sometimes, the out-of-focus-ness is adding more than it’s taking away.

Sometimes, the emotive intent of an image is made sharper precisely because it is blurry.

You’ll find some samples below.  They’re all blurry — and they all have left an indelible impression on my mind.

[And you?… do you have a favourite blurry image?  I’d love to see it…]

—Peter.

(please click on the images below to view)

↑Nikon D3S and Nikkor-NOCT 58mm @ f/1.2.

↑Leica M9 and Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH @ f/1.4.

↑Nikon D3S and Nikkor-NOCT 58mm @ f/1.2.

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

↑Leica M9 and Leica 35mm Summilux FLE @ f/1.4.

Updated: Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2.

I’ve updated my Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2 write-up to optimize viewing of (most of) the sample images.

—Peter.

The queen of all she surveys.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

My “Workers” photos featured on SteveHuffPhoto.com!

Ten of my “workers” images have been featured on the popular photography site SteveHuffPhoto.com!

The direct link to Steve’s site is here.

I’m honoured and would like to thank Mr. Huff for his ongoing support of my work!

—Peter.

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Dancing (about our memories).

In this frame, they exist perpetually in motion, but frozen in time.

We often review the images of our memories this way… in stop-start sequences.  Some frames are conjured from the darkest recesses of our minds — simultaneously blurry-and-sharp, complete-and-incomplete, and often… out of sequence.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Speak no evil.

In actuality, his mouth is just being wiped clean.

However, I can’t vouch for his thoughts…

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Tropical (Cinematic).

Silhouettes before the sunrise.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Jump, again.

Previous “jumps” may be seen here and here.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

Classic.

Notice once again the composition: her arms are forming a Strong Diagonal (it’s a bent diagonal, but rules are meant to be bent and/or broken ;)).

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

The jogger, revisited.

Fluid.

The previous Jogger can be found here.

(please click on the image to view)

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm f/1.2.

Q&A: What are apertures and f-numbers? [for novices]

[Note: This post is intended for novice, and not experienced, photographers.]

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In photography, the aperture is the adjustable opening of a lens that determines the amount of light entering through it and onto a camera’s sensor, be it digital or film.  If the aperture is large, a large amount of light will pass through the lens and enter the camera; if the aperture is small, a small amount of light will enter the camera.

Simple, right?  But, it gets a little confusing…

The problem with using the entrance aperture size to communicate a lens’ light transmitting ability is the physical reality that a longer lens will require a larger aperture to achieve the same level of light transmission as a shorter lens.  In other words, if “x” is the amount of light we wish to reach a camera’s sensor, a 75mm lens will require a bigger “hole” (aperture) at the entrance than a 50mm lens to achieve “x”.

To avoid confusion, and to standardize notation across all lens types, f-numbers — instead of actual aperture sizes — are used to communicate the light-transmitting ability of all lenses.   An f-number (also known as an f-stop, or focal ratio) is defined as the focal length of a lens divided by the aperture diameter.

You’ll usually see f-numbers labelled on lenses as a sequence of fractions:

f/1, f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, etc.

The important thing to remember is that because the f-number is a fraction, the smaller the denominator, the greater the light transmission.

(please click on the image to view LARGER)

Thus, when considering light transmission, f/1 > f/1.4 > f/2 > f/2.8 > f/4, etc.

In fact, for every step to the left in the sequence above, twice as much light is being transmitted as the preceding step.  Thus, f/1 allows for twice as much light to hit the sensor as f/1.4, and f/1.4 allows for twice as much light as f/2, etc.

Incidentally, lenses that are able to achieve maximum f-numbers of f/1, f/1.4, or f/2 (or even f/2.8) are often loosely referred to as “fast” lenses because they allow photographers, for a given amount of light, to shoot at faster shutter speeds than so-called “slower” lenses (exactly twice as fast for each step up in the f-number ladder).

It follows from the above, then, that large aperture/f-number lenses are useful in low-light situations:

↑Leica M9 and Konica Hexanon 60mm @ f/1.2.

The other main use for large aperture/f-number lenses is to achieve subject isolation.*

Thus a lens of a given focal length set to f/1.4 (for example) will create a greater background blur than when set to f/4.:

↑Leica M9 and Leica 75mm Summilux @ f/1.4

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↑Leica M9 and Leica 75mm Summilux @ f/4.

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I hope you found this useful,

—Peter.

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*The other way to achieve subject isolation is to shoot with a longer focal length.