The Graffiti Artist.

Leica M10 + Leica 35mm Summilux ASPH FLE f/1.4.

The Konica Hexanon 60mm 1.2.

A couple of years ago, I updated my review of the Konica Hexanon 60mm 1.2 by deleting the entire discussion and replacing it with the statement:

“I no longer recommend this lens.”

Do you know why I did that?  Because:

“I no longer recommend this lens.”

Since then, I’ve had a handful of people (including one in the comments section of what remains of the “review”) write to ask me whether I did this to drop the price of the 60/1.2, so that I could buy it again.

Well… no.  That would be unethical.

Part of the reason for the downgrade was the price-to-performance ratio had become too great, and part of it had to do with a change in my preferences.  Simply put, I am no longer interested in lenses that impart too much of a specific “look” to a photograph.

So for those individuals who paid an insane amount of money to own one, I’m sorry that its price has dropped, though I really don’t think I had anything to do with it.

—Peter.

[Guest Post] Aaron C Greenman and the Mamiya 6.

Aaron writes:

“Peter, as you know I have been a Leica M shooter for most of the past 15 years….. until the past three years, when I have been wrestling with the (as of now somewhat false) promise of portable mirrorless digital (the Hasselblad X1D). Back and forth, it has been a struggle to decide between the wonderful image quality and color fidelity of the Hasselblad with the obvious handling, fluidity and OVF advantages of the Leica
Anyway, I have neither now, as I await an X2D equivalent, and I’ve found and am using what I pray every night for exactly in digital – the Mamiya 6, along with its 75mm and 50mm lenses (approx. 50mm and 28mm equivalent).
For any Leica M enthusiast, the Mamiya 6 (or 7, if you want to shoot 6×7), is a wonderfully familiar experience: a big nice optical coupled rangefinder, compact design for its 6×6 image size, a collapsible lens mount, and quality, lightweight lenses with sharp and characterful rendering. I have also always wanted to shoot square natively, and it is a simple joy in a square, uncluttered viewfinder – never having to turn the camera takes one more variable out of the composition equation. 
The accompanying photo was taken with the 6, the 50mm and Ektar 100 on a recent trip in United Arab Emirates, and shows the Mamiya excels in the most key area – an instantaneous shutter that allows its owner to precisely capture the moment. 
All in all, it is an experience of pure photographic bliss…… just be mindful of the limits of 12 shots per roll! 😉”
Aaron, thank you for your thoughts, which I’m sure will be helpful to photographers out there contemplating getting the Mamiya 6.  As an aside, I never thought I’d see you shooting film, and it’s nice to see you indulge in some colour photography!  Keep up the great work.
For my part, I have really wanted to get back to film (and almost did so recently) but the constant announcements of film stock discontinuations and ever-tightening shipping restrictions on chemicals for developing have made me hesitate to (re-)commit.  It’s images like this, however, and what I see over at Mark’s site that keep the idea of film photography alive for me.
Lastly, regarding your comment…
“…it has been a struggle to decide between the wonderful image quality and color fidelity of the Hasselblad with the obvious handling, fluidity and OVF advantages of the Leica.”
…much like you, my ideal camera would be designed like a Leica M with a proper (OVF) rangefinder, but would contain a medium format sensor, in a body no larger than a Mamiya 6 (or Hasselblad X1D).
Leica, if you’re interested, we can help you do it!
(one can hope…)
—Peter.

The First Supper.

Leica M10 + Leica 35mm Summilux ASPH FLE f/1.4.

Cousins – Happy Easter, 2019.

↑Leica M10 + Leica 35mm Summilux ASPH FLE f/1.4.

The Cousins, from years-gone-by:

Cousins, Easter 2018 (the only year we had a sunny Easter):

Nikon D850 + Nikon 28mm f/1.4 E.

Cousins, Easter 2017:

↑Leica M9 (CCD Lives!Prosophos Open Letter to Leica) + Leica 21mm Super-Elmar ASPH.

Cousins, Easter 2015:

↑Leica M9 (CCD Lives!Prosophos Open Letter to Leica) + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH.

Cousins, Easter 2012:

↑Leica M9 (CCD Lives!Prosophos Open Letter to Leica) + Leica 35mm Summilux ASPH FLE.

Cousins, Easter 2011:

↑Nikon D3 + Nikkor-Noct 58/1.2.

The Panasonic S1.

I just got around to reading Steve Huff’s review of the Panasonic S1, and I must say that two things really, really impressed me:

  1. The colour reproduction at high ISO.
  2. The dynamic range.

Generally speaking, the sample images have a special look – I can immediately tell that there is something different (in a good way) going on there.

I am not interested in the camera per se (because I prefer rangefinders), but I am interested in working with sensors like this.

—Peter.

 

Beach Acrobatics.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Sisters and the TV Show.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Odds and Ends.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

R – Portrait in Barbados (Coffee).

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Morning Moon.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Snow Honey.

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

Green.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

(Another) Saturday with Nana.

Different lens today, different vibe.

(here’s the previous Saturday with Nana)

—Peter.

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

Good Morning.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Sisters.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.