Category Archives: Portrait

7Artisans 50mm f/1.1 (cropped image).

I’ve been getting a lot of questions about wide open performance of the The 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1 (Leica M mount), since revealing that it is my Undisclosed Lens #7.

So, I thought I would show another example image, followed by a central crop.

The last time I did this was when I was comparing this lens to the Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH.  Despite making that comparison, I don’t believe there is any value in such head-to-head tests when considering this lens, because it is not an optic that one purchases for checklist attributes.  Instead, the 7Artisans 50/1.1 should be regarded much like the Leica Noctilux f.1 and the Zeiss Sonnar f/1.5 lenses, which are coveted for their artistic rendering.

Having said that, the 50/1.1 is often mistakenly labelled as “soft” when used at f/1.1.  Though it is not razor sharp wide open (and can be “glowy” at near distance — see the aforementioned comparison), it is certainly sharp enough for me.  I would, in fact, caution anyone who believes that this lens is “soft” at f/1.1 to make sure they have calibrated it correctly (or are practicing good technique).

Case in point, here is another image taken at the time of the Night Light photo I recently posted, photographed  at f/1.1:

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

Now, here is the magnified central portion of the frame (focus is on the eyelashes of the near eye):

I will let you decide if it is sharp enough for you and whether — in the case of an f/1.1 lens — it really matters.

—Peter.

Night Light.

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

Shades (Modern).

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

Shades (Lo-Fi).

Leica M10 + 7Artisans 50mm f/1.1.

The Sunset Portrait, 2.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Good Morning Greeting.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #AceUpMySleeve.

Nighttime Giggles (1, 2, 3).

Technical: ISO 2000 (+ “pushed” 2 stops in LR) |  1/60 sec.

High ISO is overrated and poor light leads to poor image quality (see my previous article).

Fortunately, it was the moment I was after.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #AceUpMySleeve.

The Photographers (Portrait).

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #AceUpMySleeve.

The Portrait by the Curtain, Revisited.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #AceUpMySleeve.

Happy 2019!

Happy 2019!

May good light shine upon you.

—Peter.

(Test Shot #6 – Undisclosed Lens #7)

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

 

Praying for time.

Test Shot #4, a candid portrait, created with Undisclosed Lens #7.

The title is borrowed from George Michael’s song.

Maybe we should all be praying for time.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

The Christmas Portrait, 2018 Edition.

This also happens to be Test Shot #3 of Undisclosed Lens #7, stopped down this time in order to get everyone in focus (the first two test images were shot wide open).

Of note, after only a day’s worth of experience with this lens, I was confidant enough to use it for a group portrait.

As an aside, we had a relatively warm Christmas week this year, hence the absence of snow.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

Test Shot #2 – Portrait – Undisclosed Lens #7.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

 

10 Christmas Scenes.

 

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

The Sunset Portrait, Christmas Edition.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Oh the irony.

Today I finally figured out how to properly process my Leica M10 files (the irony is that last weekend I announced the end of this blog).

After months of experimentation, I created a custom preset in Lightroom that strikes a nice balance between punching up the contrast and colour, enhancing skin tones, and preserving detail.  The overall effect is subtle, which is what I want.

Most of the commercial presets I’ve tried result in cartoonish effects (specifically, with respect to colour shifts and detail obliteration) that are painted over with digital “grain”, so I’ve avoided using them.

Here is an example of my preset in action:

(click for a larger view)

Here is another example:

(click for a larger view)

I can’t wait to work with this (and possibly fine-tune it some more).

By the way, I want to thank all of you who took the time to write to me, both on this site and via email, with words of encouragement.  I am very grateful for your kindness.

—Peter.