Category Archives: Favourite

Praying for time.

Test Shot #4, a candid portrait, created with Undisclosed Lens #7.

The title is borrowed from George Michael’s song.

Maybe we should all be praying for time.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

The Christmas Portrait, 2018 Edition.

This also happens to be Test Shot #3 of Undisclosed Lens #7, stopped down this time in order to get everyone in focus (the first two test images were shot wide open).

Of note, after only a day’s worth of experience with this lens, I was confidant enough to use it for a group portrait.

As an aside, we had a relatively warm Christmas week this year, hence the absence of snow.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

Test Shot #2 – Portrait – Undisclosed Lens #7.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

 

10 Christmas Scenes.

 

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Test Shot – Undisclosed Lens #7.

Sometimes, when you’re lacking inspiration, you have to find it in a new piece of gear.

(spoken like a photographer trying to justify another lens)

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #7.

The Sunset Portrait, Christmas Edition.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Oh the irony.

Today I finally figured out how to properly process my Leica M10 files (the irony is that last weekend I announced the end of this blog).

After months of experimentation, I created a custom preset in Lightroom that strikes a nice balance between punching up the contrast and colour, enhancing skin tones, and preserving detail.  The overall effect is subtle, which is what I want.

Most of the commercial presets I’ve tried result in cartoonish effects (specifically, with respect to colour shifts and detail obliteration) that are painted over with digital “grain”, so I’ve avoided using them.

Here is an example of my preset in action:

(click for a larger view)

Here is another example:

(click for a larger view)

I can’t wait to work with this (and possibly fine-tune it some more).

By the way, I want to thank all of you who took the time to write to me, both on this site and via email, with words of encouragement.  I am very grateful for your kindness.

—Peter.

Season’s Greetings… and…

For almost a decade I’ve enjoyed posting images and engaging in discussion with fellow photographers and photo enthusiasts on this site.

Truth be told, it wasn’t always a fun process, and I wasn’t always happy doing it.

I did however strive to be honest… with you and with myself.  I was wrong about some things, changed my equipment far too frequently, and often overestimated my abilities and influence.

And I documented it all, here.

Now I believe the time has come to stop posting.  Knowing myself, I will continue to have an intermittent presence online (I love the photography community far too much to completely stop interacting with all of you) but it won’t be here.

Thank you for your attention and support.

I hope 2019 is kind to you and your loved ones.

(And please remember to enjoy Life’s Little Moments.)

Season’s Greetings.

—Peter.

 

EDIT: December 29, 2018.

After a restful holiday and an almost complete recovery from illness, I’ve decided to keep this blog going for as long as I can.  Thank you again for all of your messages of support.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

 

 

A little piece (1 and 2).

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

14 Years.

Happy Birthday.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Decorating the Tree (1 and 2).

‘Tis the Season.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

The Fall Concert (1 – 10).

These are super-talented high school students… I was floored by their performance(s).

Photographed last night.

—Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #1.

Sleepy Eyes.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Sunday Afernoon (1 – 10).

We took the subway downtown earlier today to watch Come from Away.

I took a few photos along the way.

—Peter.

   

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

48 years.

Happy Birthday.

 —Peter.

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #1.

 

Addendum:

Same flowers, same lens, this time with some Ice Light lighting assistance:

Leica M10 + Undisclosed Lens #1.

The problem with digital photo archiving.

The New York Times published an article this week, discussing the practical difficulties with long-term storage and tracking of all of the digital photos we create:

This is an issue I’m sure we’ve all thought about.

My working solution has been to store cherished photos on two back-up external drives, one that saves them in real-time and another that I use for a yearly back-up (but that remains in a safe the rest of the year).   I also have many images uploaded to a cloud-based storage service.

I’m not saying this method is the best, or even good, but for me it’s the solution that best balances a sense of (false?) security with practical considerations.

In contrast to many individuals, I tend to avoid taking photos with my iPhone because, although they too are uploaded automatically to Apple’s servers (i.e. the Cloud), I don’t often make back-up copies on my external drives, so I feel less in control of them.  Also, I prefer photographing with a dedicated camera anyway.

A few years ago, I read an article in The Telegraph where a top-tier Google executive predicted that all of our digital photos will likely be wiped out, if we don’t figure out a better way to preserve them.

Thinking about that further, I guess the best thing I’ve done to preserve our family’s images was to create photo books which were distributed, annually, to family members.  The problem with this is that it’s very time-consuming and expensive (especially when you are making half a dozen copies of each book).  Hence the last time I did it was in 2014.

Nonetheless, I guess I better start making books again… maybe next year.

Addendum:  I almost forgot — the other thing I’ve done is to intermittently photograph with the anti-digital medium: film.

—Peter.

The Children.

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.

Game of Fetch (1, 2, and 3).

Leica M10 + Leica 50mm Summilux ASPH f/1.4.