Ghost Train, revisited.

Ghost Train, revisited

↑Leica M9 and Leica 24mm Summilux @ f/1.4.

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4 thoughts on “Ghost Train, revisited.

  1. andygemmell says:

    I really like this Peter. The perspective and movement combination adds an extra layer to the image…along with the lighting.

  2. Karen Heller says:

    I can’t hold out. I have a “non-posting” policy. There are many times looking at your site and images when I have been tempted to do so to share my appreciation. This image became a tipping point. Your talent is, to use a younger-than-me syntax….ridiculous.

    To name a few? Technical skill. Check. Heartful and kind eye. Check. Encouraging and generous. Check. Inspirational. Check. Oh, heck. I would say your work checks every box but that would be silly. There are not even categories imagined yet that I fully expect you will imagine and then we will have to check those, too.

    This image made me think about one of my parental failings that has nagged at me in a “back-burner-wasn’t even sure I was still thinking about it any longer” way. When my children used to ask me why they had to learn geometry when they couldn’t see it ever being useful to them, I gave all the expected (and very true) answers and rebuttals to their protests. They would find reasons later when they were older and better able to understand many things. But in that moment when they were looking for an answer that made sense to them in their adolescent years, my textbook answers sounded like a lot of yadi-yadi-yadi. What I didn’t have at the time is your portfolio to show them. Geometry is very useful, of course. What I never thought to tell them is that understanding it and recognizing it all around us can be harnessed to create, capture, and understand beauty and feeling. It can also be harnessed to tell a story in ways that words cannot. I hope there are some math teachers among your blog followers. (The art teachers already know this, of course as I am sure many of you “parents” already do, too.) Your images would be a master’s class, an inspiration, and a welcome answer to “why” for a math classroom with unhappy, eye-rolling budding artists and photographers just waiting for the math class bell to ring. They may not yet know how and when they will blossom or what might inspire them to do so. It just might be an occasional geometry class in a dark room with beautiful photographs projected on a screen. It just might be geometry homework that requires a camera.

    Your images make me stop to look deeply. My vision is improving. Thank you for sharing so much.

    • Prosophos says:

      Dear Karen,

      I’m glad you broke your “non-posting” policy :).

      I hesitated sharing this one for a while (it was taken over a month ago). I saw the “geometry” unfolding before me when I captured it, and I was struggling to contain it all within the 24mm field of view. I barely made it.

      Why did I hesitate to post this image?

      I knew I had captured something special and I didn’t want to just throw it up on the site with my usual non-introduction. I wanted to say something about it. To explain it. However, in the end I decided to let the image stand or fall on its own merit, like I do most of the time with my images (https://prosophos.com/2012/10/29/a-good-image-should-grab-you/).

      Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that you would show up here and write what you wrote.

      I am so grateful.

      Thank you,

      Peter.

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